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Stitch has had a busy month – new features galore

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June 4 · Issue #21 · View online
Stitch
//Product Updates
Amazon S3 destination is now available in open beta
Stitch can now load your data to Amazon S3 data lakes. We support both JSON and CSV formats, and provide the ability to customize S3 Object Keys to control how your data is stored. Read all about it, then spin up your own Amazon S3 destination.
New and updated integrations: GitHub, Zuora, HubSpot
Stitch has a new GitHub integration that lets you extract data such as pull requests, commits, and issues.
Last week we updated our Zuora integration. The new version, based on open source Singer code, lets you choose between Zuora’s REST and AQuA API, makes available additional tables and columns, and lets you replicate only the columns you select. Also, when you use the AQuA API, you’ll now be able to replicate deleted records.
We’ve also updated our HubSpot integration, adding several new features, including column-level selection.
Free historical data loads
Want to add a new integration to your data warehouse but feeling uneasy about paying for all the new rows you’ll have to load? Now Stitch will replicate seven days of unlimited data for all new integrations you set up without impacting your monthly quota. Learn all about it.
Announcing time-based replication scheduling
Stitch customers now have more control over when Stitch will start extracting data. You can now “anchor” a replication schedule to a specific time to ensure that you’re getting data predictably and when it’s most needed. Read our documentation on anchor scheduling for all the details.
MySQL binlog replication is now in beta
Stitch can now use the MySQL binary log to help replicate your data. Log-based replication allows for incremental replication of a table without a replication key, and will capture and persist deletes. It’s now available as a replication method in the Table Settings of MySQL integrations. 
// Join Stitch and Snowflake in Seattle
Stitch CEO Jake Stein is presenting at Snowflake’s Data for Breakfast event at the Four Seasons in Seattle on June 14. Come network with your peers and learn about new advancements in data integration, data warehousing, and data analytics. 
// From our blog
Peek under the hood at Stitch's replication engine
You pick your data sources and Stitch moves them to your data warehouse. How do we make that happen without ever losing a record? Take a trip through Stitch’s data pipeline and see.
What data-driven businesses need to know about GDPR
GDPR, the European data privacy directive, went into effect last month. If you haven’t already figured out how it impacts your business, here’s what you need to know.
How to ensure HIPAA compliance for your BI data pipeline
Since compliance issues are already on your mind, don’t forget HIPAA. Read about how to ensure HIPAA compliance with Stitch.
Interesting reading from around the Web
Here are some links to interesting articles we shared around internally recently, on the business of SaaS, handling insane numbers of daily events, and more.
// Company updates
Meet the Stitch team
Dylan Sprayberry has been manning a keyboard as one of our technical support specialists since April of last year. Read about Dylan and the work he does on our Support team.
We’re hiring!
Stitch is growing. We’re looking for a lead front-end engineer, two support specialists, and talented sales development reps to help bring more customers on board. Read about our open jobs on our Careers page
// On the calendar
June is Lane Courtesy Month according to the National Motorists Association, so try to be extra nice on the roads. National Yo-Yo Day falls on June 6, reputedly the birthday of yo-yo entrepreneur Donald F. Duncan Sr., while Clark Kent celebrates his birthday on June 18, the day Ma and Pa Kent found baby Kal-El, who would grow up to be Superman. Speaking of super men, we celebrate Father’s Day on June 17. Finally, June 26 marks the 21st anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone; the first printing was a whopping 500 copies, of which 300 went to libraries.
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